Deadline extended for bidding of Asia Pacific Hospice Conference 2021!

The APHN Council is pleased to invite member organisations wishing to host the 14th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference 2021 to send in their application to the APHN Secretariat.

Click here to download the bid form and the bidding documents.

Please email the bid documents to aphn@aphn.org.

Please note to send your file as “Bid for 14th APHC_<your organisation name>”

All organisations submitting a bid must fulfill the following requirements for their application to be considered.

  • Have been a member of APHN for AT LEAST 3 years
  • All bids must be complete in writing

Please note the deadline for submission of bids has been extended till 21 July 2017.

Standards & Quality of Care Indicators in Palliative Care Symposium

“In 2014, the World Health Assembly passed a resolution to strengthen palliative care as a component of a country’s health care system. The Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA) / WHO Atlas in Palliative Care 2014, maps out national development in palliative care. In each country, patients, healthcare workers, governments, donors and other stakeholders are starting to enquire about standards of care and what indicators could be used to compare palliative care services.”

This meeting organised by Hospis Malaysia and in collaboration with the WHPCA, brings representatives from several regional and national palliative care organisations to discuss the various approaches taken to address the above topic.

Find out more on https://www.hospismalaysia.org/symposiumpc/.

For further information, please contact Wai Mun at +61-03-9133 3936 (ext: 267) or email education@hospismalaysia.org

Free Accommodation for APHC 2017 Delegates

St Joseph’s Home Opens its Doors

SJH

For almost 40 years, St Joseph’s Home has been caring for the aged and destitute in Singapore regardless of race or religion. The home has recently moved in to a brand new 412-bed facility in Jurong West (western Singapore).  Its residents are provided with person-centred care through a range of holistic services including nursing and hospice care, psychosocial support, and therapy such as music and art

Catholic Welfare Services Singapore is generously offering free accommodation for up to 32 persons attending the Asia Pacific Hospice Conference (APHC 2017).

What is being offered

  • Same sex, dormitory style accommodation with shared facilities
  • Daily breakfast
  • Daily transport to and from conference venue during 27-29 July
  • Earliest check in date: 25 July 2017
  • Latest check out date: 30 July 2017
  • Priority will be given to Nurses and Allied Healthcare workers, as well as persons who are unable to obtain other sponsorship.

To qualify, you should be

  • from a low/middle income country, and
  • a member of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

(Annual membership starts from USD10, and entitles members to a SGD75 [about USD50] discount on the APHC 2017 registration fees). Click here to Join the APHN

To apply

Apply by 14 May 2017.

Shortlisted persons will be informed by 19 May 2017.

If awarded the free accommodation, you will need to register for the conference by 25 May 2017 (you will be allowed early bird registration rate). Otherwise, your place will be offered to another delegate.

Click here to apply

Enquires may be sent to aphn@aphn.org

Rosalie Shaw APHC 2017 Bursary

Rosalie Shaw APHC 2017 Bursary

The Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN) is inviting applications for the Rosalie Shaw APHC 2017 Bursary for delegates attending the 12th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference in 2017. This bursary is named after former APHN Executive Director, Dr Rosalie Shaw, to help delegates from low/middle income countries attend the conference.

What is being offered

  • 20 bursaries are available
  • The amount of each bursary is SGD500
  • Priority will be given to Nurses and Allied Health workers, as well as persons who are unable to obtain other sponsorship.

To qualify, you should be

  • from a low/middle income country, and
  • a member of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

(Annual membership starts from USD10, and entitles members to a SGD75 [about USD50] discount on the APHC 2017 registration fees). Click here to Join the APHN

To apply

Apply by 14 May 2017.

Shortlisted persons will be informed by 19 May 2017.

If awarded the bursary, you will need to register for the conference by 25 May 2017 (you will be allowed the early bird registration rate). Otherwise, the bursary will be offered to another delegate.

Click here to apply

Enquires may be sent to aphn@aphn.org

SHC-LCPC Forum – Innovation comes from re-thinking

Mar17 SHC-LCPC

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Palliative Care Workshops: Clinical Ethics In Palliative Care

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop

WORKSHOP ON CLINICAL ETHICS IN PALLIATIVE CARE (01-02 APRIL 2017)

Much of the issues involved in medical ethics revolve around the issue of illness and the preservation of life. As Palliative Care deals with patients and families at the transitions of care, issues surrounding medical ethics become more common. There is increasing public discussion in areas such as withholding and withdrawal of treatment, mental capacity, medical futility and physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. Those involved in palliative care should be aware of both ethical issues as well as the clinical evidence that should guide their practice. This workshop deals with many of the ethical issues in palliative care mainly through case discussions.

For further enquiries, kindly contact Wai Mun via telephone: +61-03 9133 3936 (extension 267) or email  education@hospismalaysia.org

LCPC-APHC-SHC Workshops 2017

LCPC-APHC-SHC Workshop 2017 - A Holistic Assessment of PatientsLCPC-APHC-SHC Workshop 2017 - The Role of a Pharmacist in Palliative Care

Dear colleagues

LCPC will be hosting two conference workshops during the APHC 2017 in July. Registrations are opened now!

SHC-LCPC Forum – Deprescribing in Palliative Care

Feb17 SHC-LCPC

 

Abstract Submission for APHC 2017

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Dear Colleagues

The 12th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference (APHC) 2017 will be accepting abstracts for poster and/or oral presentations till 18 February 2017, 23:59 (GMT+8). You may wish to read more on the criteria and submission details here.

We look forward to seeing you at the 12th APHC in July!

APHN – Hospis Malaysia Palliative Care Workshop: Palliative Care Nursing

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop

WORKSHOP OF PALLIATIVE CARE NURSING (18-19 February 2017)

It is crucial that healthcare providers involved in palliative care services possess the necessary skill and knowledge to ensure that holistic patient-centred care is never compromised. Palliative nursing care kick starts our first module of our palliative care workshops every year.

This 2-day workshop addresses topics on patient assessment, wound management, use of syringe driver, communication and the entire spectrum of patient care which is vital towards ensuring patients receive the due care they need in their place of care.

For further information, please contact Wai Mun at 03 – 9133 3936 (ext: 267) or email  education@hospismalaysia.org

Pain Association of Singapore Annual Scientific Meeting 2017

See their lineup of speakers at the picture below!

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The Pain Association of Singapore (PAS) Annual Scientific Meeting will be held on 25th March 2017 at One Farrer Hotel.

This one-day refresher programme is catered for the varied interests of medical, nursing and allied health professionals who are passionate about pain management. A diverse range of topics have been planned such as updates in analgesic pharmacology, approaches to pain conditions, basic radiological imaging reading, non-pharmacological therapies, and many more. 

Do check out their conference website at this link!

What happens when palliative care intersects with other specialties?

Loving Brandon was hard. Not because of Brandon – he was a beautiful boy. He had beautiful eyes and a gentle heart.  He loved massages and his face lit up during sensory therapy. He also had severe brain damage and limited ability to communicate. We could never know for sure how much he did or didn’t understand, but we feel certain he knew his people and he understood love.

Loving was not hard because of Brandon. It was hard because it hurt so badly to watch him suffer. On top of his severe cognitive challenges, Brandon had a contagious respiratory infection. That meant there were lots of rules around how and where he could be cared for. The rules came from a good intentions –  intentions to help cure and to protect others from infection. But for a child who already has a life limiting condition, those rules were pretty hard to understand.

Brandon only had a small circle of people who really knew him. He couldn’t speak up like a typical kid and tell someone when he was hurting, sad or sick. It broke our hearts when he moved to a specialty  respiratory diseases facility, even though it made sense medically. We knew that no treatment on earth could offer him a long life, so we wished for his remaining time to be peaceful. We wanted him to have security, comfort and a predicable routine – things we knew were important to him.  But treatment for his respiratory condition plunged him into a new routine, a new system, and left him surrounded by strangers. Kind strangers for sure – but they didn’t know Brandon.

There are no easy answers in palliative care.  Brandon’s story will always break our hearts. We are thankful we were able to visit with him in his isolation unit, but incredibly sad he was not at home when he died. These situations push us to keep talking, keep asking ourselves the hard questions – what happens when palliative care intersects with other specialty areas? Sometimes different branches of health care  act in synergy –  mental health, physiotherapy and many other specialties are vital components of end-of-life care. But sometimes it’s not so simple. The right thing in one book is not the right thing in another. We are so grateful that these discussions are part of medical practice these days. Our hard conversations belong to a wider debate. Scientists and doctors around the world are studying and talking about these issues.

For us, right now, we are feeling sad that Brandon has died without returning home. We wonder if we failed him somehow, if we could have changed things. It’s a pretty normal part of grief to ask these questions, but its also part of understanding and processing this painful sorrow.  By seeking to understand, we are seeking to find a way forward,  to figure out what our hearts say about some of those hard questions. Sure, there’s a whole lot of research going on – but sometimes what your heart tells you makes a lot of sense.

For us, right now, our hearts are feeling incredibly sad.

The article above is republished with permission from Butterfly Children’s Hospice. Read other articles at their blog here.