APHN Online Educational Series: Communication Skills Training by Prof Amy Chow

 

 

Dear friends

The APHN Webinar Lecture Series for 2018 is starting in May! Want to learn from the regional experts but unable to travel due to your schedule? Fret not! Join us at this webinar to interact with our speaker and join in discussions real-time, just like you would in a face to face seminar!

We are very honoured to have Dr Amy Chow as our first speaker of the year. Dr Amy Chow is Associate Professor with the Department of Social Work and Social Administration, the University of Hong Kong. She is a member of the prestigious International Workgroup on Death, Dying and Bereavement, a registered social worker with the Hong Kong Social Workers Registration Board and a fellow in thanatology with the Association of Death Education and Counselling. Dr Chow’s field of specialisation is in palliative care, grief and bereavement.

Register now at http://aphn.org/event-registration/ !  Registration is FREE for APHN members. (For organisational members, please register with your organisation’s email)

An email acknowledgement will be sent to you when you have registered successfully.

Should you have further enquiries, please email the Secretariat Office at aphn@aphn.org

P.S. Are there any expert speakers that you will like APHN to invite? Tell us in the comments below!

 

APHN Mini Interview Series – Professor Myo Nyunt, Myanmar

This interview is the third of the mini-interview series featuring members of the 17th Council of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

This month, we interviewed Professor Myo Nyunt, the appointed council[1] member from Myanmar. Prof Nyunt is the President of the U HlaTun (Hospice) Cancer Foundation.

How did you come to the palliative care field?

It was very unusual for a pathologist by profession to be involved in palliative care. It was sometime in 1994 when Daw Mya Sanda Tun, daughter of U Hla Tun, came to me for unexplained fever for investigation and treatment. I did a venepuncture and 26 parameter haematological test. In the blood film I found that there were some abnormal cells and further investigations including bone marrow examination revealed acute leukaemia/lymphoma. To cut the story short, she ultimately went to London for further management in view of a bone marrow transplant in 1995. Unfortunately, the transplant failed.  U Hla Tun was very grief stricken and decided to build a hospice in Yangon, Myanmar, in 1998. Since then, I have become an executive member and worked in the hospice over the years until today, where I am the current President of the U Hla Tun Hospice Cancer Foundation. I am currently in charge of the medical affairs of the hospice in Yangon and Mandalay. The Mandalay hospice was established in 2003.

Please share with us more about the hospice work.

We have two hospices, one located in Yangon, and the other in Mandalay. We have resident doctors caring for the cancer stricken patients. Our hospices care for cancer patients that are the poorest of the poor and cases that are beyond treatment. When our patients are unable to afford cycles of palliative chemotherapy, radiotherapy, we do cover the costs for some of them to complete their treatment. We also cover the costs for surgery in some cases. However, we are still mainly providing palliative care services. The staff nurses and nursing aids attend to patients’ various needs. Specialists from various disciplines like medicine, surgery, anaesthesiology, OBGY, dental surgery, clerics and social workers also form part of the team and conduct ward rounds on designated days.

What do you think are the current opportunities and challenges in Myanmar in developing palliative care?

The challenges in Myanmar in developing palliative care are considerable, especially due to the availability of oral morphine and morphine syrup. We now have a pharmaceutical factory which is ready to supply the amount needed for hospices. However, specific procedures are not yet available for the purchase and processing of the medicine. In this area work is still work in progress.

We are glad that we have trained staff who have already attended the training of trainers’ course under the Lien Collaborative for Palliative Care project.

How will you hope to see the APHN collaborating with relevant stakeholders in Myanmar?

APHN has a strong presence in Myanmar involving both the public organisations, like Pain Society, and private organisations like the U Hla Tun Hospice Cancer Foundation, Shwe Young Hnin Si Foundation, the Oncology Society and the Myanmar Medical Association.

The APHN representatives have met with the Minister of Health and officials from the Ministry of Health and Sports. They have also given lectures and hands-on training in Naypyidaw, Yangon and Mandalay. Most of the palliative care doctors and nurses in Myanmar are familiar with them.

In terms of policy, I think we do need to raise more awareness on the subject of palliative care and its necessity. We also need to have better community involvement.

If you were to choose a colour to represent your journey in palliative care, what will it be and why?

The colour I chose will be the evening tide (light purplish blue) colour. The colour is often used by hotels. I feel that it is not dull, yet cheerful and peaceful enough, as if the name implies it is set for a “quiet night’s sleep”. Out of so many philanthropic works, I chose to be an APHN Council member because I hope to be a role model for the younger generation of physicians in Myanmar and incite them to continue in this noble work.

[1]The APHN Council consists of 7 members to be appointed by sectors on a rotation to be determined alphabetically according to the name of the sectors (Constitution 12.2a), 7 elected members, and 6 Co-opted member

Acknowledgement of form submission

This is to acknowledge that your form has been submitted successfully.

Please do not hesitate to contact aphn@aphn.org should you require further assistance.

Warm regards
APHN Secretariat Office

Paediatric Palliative Care Service Directory Update

Dear friend

Thank you for adding your service to the Paediatric Palliative Care Service Directory.

Please do not hesitate to contact Joyce at aphn@aphn.org should you wish to find out more information about the Paediatric Palliative Care Special Interest Group and our activities!

Warm regards

APHN Secretariat Office

4th Maruzza Congress on Paediatric Palliative Care

Click http://www.childrenpalliativecarecongress.org/congress-2018/ to go to the conference website.

The APHN is proud to be a supporting partner of this conference.

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop: Communication Skills

Dear Doctors, Nurses and fellow healthcare professionals,

PALLIATIVE CARE WORKSHOP ON COMMUNICATION SKILLS (14 – 15 April 2018)

We would like to invite interested participants to our 2-day Palliative Care Workshop on Communication Skills which will be conducted from 14 – 15 April 2018.

Effective communication skills are an absolute necessity towards providing well planned palliative care which is delivered through the collaborative efforts of many people including the patient, their care givers (family and friends) and healthcare providers.

This workshop deals with the mechanics of communication that ranges from issues, techniques and practical sessions when dealing with patients with life-limiting illness and their families.

This workshop will be facilitated by Dr Rebecca Coles-Gale, Clinical & Health Psychologist from the United Kingdom together with Dr Sylvia McCarthy from Hospis Malaysia. This workshop will focus on highly interactive role plays, problem-based learning and case studies in small group settings.

It is conducted in English, all participants will be expected to communicate and interact during the workshop. Doctors and nurses will benefit most as the most difficult areas are encountered during clinical consultations.

Registration for workshop can be made online at our website: www.hospismalaysia.org For further enquiries, kindly contact Communication Department via telephone: 03 9133 3936.

Thank You.

 

Yours sincerely

 

Dr Ednin Hamzah

Chief Executive Officer, Hospis Malaysia

 

EPEC-Paediatrics Workshop 2018

The EPEC-Paediatrics Workshop registration has closed due to overwhelming response. Thank you for your support.

34th LCPC-SHC Postgraduate Course in Palliative Medicine opens for registration!

Dear friends, the APHN will like to share this message from the Lien Centre for Palliative Care, Singapore.

We are pleased to announce that the 34th LCPC-SHC Postgraduate Course in Palliative Medicine will be held on 25-27 Apr 2017 (Wed-Fri, 3 days). Please refer to the above course brochure for more details.

Course Description & Objectives

This course is a foundational course in the principles and practice of palliative medicine which is applicable to all fields of medicine.

The objective is to increase professional confidence and competence in the management of patients with terminal illness. Course participants would also have opportunities to personally assess patients and to discuss the most appropriate management strategies with palliative care physicians and other specialists in the field.

Who Should Attend?

Any doctor (medical officer/resident, family physician or specialist) who is interested to learn about palliative care is welcome to attend this course. Priority will be given to local physicians working in the related fields.

Venue and Fee

Venue: HCA Hospice Care, Level 3, Auditorium

12 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308437

Fee:       S$800 (inclusive of GST)

(Payment details will be advised upon registration)

Registration

Please click the following link https://www.duke-nus.edu.sg/lcpc/course-catalogue for online registration from 14 Feb to 13 Mar 2018. Registration may close earlier without prior notice once the max intake capacity is reached.

For course enquiries, please contact us at lcpc@duke-nus.edu.sg.

Thank you.

Best Regards,

Education Team

Lien Centre for Palliative Care

Paediatric palliative care improves patient outcomes and reduces healthcare costs: evaluation of a home-based program

Abstract

Background

Around the world, different models of paediatric palliative care have responded to the unique needs of children with life shortening conditions. However, research confirming their utility and impact is still lacking. This study compared patient-related outcomes and healthcare expenditures between those who received home-based paediatric palliative care and standard care. The quality of life and caregiver burden for patients receiving home-based paediatric palliative care were also tracked over the first year of enrolment to evaluate the service’s longitudinal impact.

Method

A structured impact and cost evaluation of Singapore-based HCA Hospice Care’s Star PALS (Paediatric Advance Life Support) programme was conducted over a three-year period, employing both retrospective and prospective designs with two patient groups.

Results

Compared to the control group (n = 67), patients receiving home-based paediatric palliative care (n = 71) spent more time at home than in hospital in the last year of life by 52 days (OR = 52.30, 95% CI: 25.44–79.17) with at least two fewer hospital admissions (OR = 2.46, 95% CI: 0.43–4.48); and were five times more likely to have an advance care plan formulated (OR = 5.51, 95% CI: 1.55–19.67). Medical costs incurred by this group were also considerably lower (by up to 87%). Moreover, both patients’ quality of life (in terms of pain and emotion), and caregiver burden showed improvement within the first year of enrolment into the programme.

Discussion

Our findings suggest that home-based paediatric palliative care brings improved resource utilization and cost-savings for both patients and healthcare providers. More importantly, the lives of patients and their caregivers have improved, with terminally ill children and their caregivers being able to spend more quality time at home at the final stretch of the disease.

Conclusions

The benefits of a community paediatric palliative care programme have been validated. Study findings can become key drivers when engaging service commissioners or even policy makers in appropriate settings.

Read the full open access article here.

The status of palliative care in the Asia-Pacific Region

“…it is easy to become immersed in a sense of failure when faced with this enormous challenge. When our hands are empty and our hearts heavy, reach out to colleagues, be kind to ourselves, turn to the joy and the beauty to be found in the simplicity of a smile, an act of kindness, a song or a sunrise, reconnect and persevere together…”

Spruyt O. The status of palliative care in the Asia-Pacific Region. Asia Pac J Oncol Nurs [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Jan 22];5:12-4. Available from: http://www.apjon.org/text.asp?2018/5/1/12/222133

 

Hong Kong 2nd Community End-of-Life Care International Conference

The Community End-of-Life Care International Conference will be held on June 20-21, 2018. Sponsored by the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, registration is FREE.

Some of the keynote speakers for this conference are Dr. Stephen Connor – Executive Director, Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA), Prof. Irene Higginson – Professor of Palliative Care and Policy King’s College London; King’s Health Partners, Director, Cicely Saunders Institute, Prof. David Currow – Professor of Palliative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Prof. Wang Ying Wei –Director General, Health Promotion Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan

Find out more at the conference website here.

End of life care: how do we move forward?

Abstract: Death and dying are inevitable. High quality and accessible palliative and end of life care can help people who are facing progressive life-threatening and life-limiting illness, and those dear to them, by focusing on their quality of life and addressing the problems associated with their situation. This paper draws attention to the scale of the challenge, some of the key areas we could address and the shifts in culture, mindset and leadership approach that are needed.

Conclusion: The Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care Framework explicitly recognises through its six ambitions, i.e. each person is seen as an individual, each person has fair access to care, maximising comfort and wellbeing, care is coordinated, staff are prepared to care, and each community is prepared to help. It acknowledges that achieving this whole-system approach of ‘what good looks like’ in palliative and end of life care requires every individual, organisation and society as a whole to work together, so that the goal of the best possible end of life care can be achieved.

Read the full article here. (J R Coll Physicians Edinb 2017; 47: 369–73)