Hong Kong 2nd Community End-of-Life Care International Conference

The Community End-of-Life Care International Conference will be held on June 20-21, 2018. Sponsored by the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, registration is FREE.

Some of the keynote speakers for this conference are Dr. Stephen Connor – Executive Director, Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA), Prof. Irene Higginson – Professor of Palliative Care and Policy King’s College London; King’s Health Partners, Director, Cicely Saunders Institute, Prof. David Currow – Professor of Palliative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Prof. Wang Ying Wei –Director General, Health Promotion Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan

Find out more at the conference website here.

End of life care: how do we move forward?

Abstract: Death and dying are inevitable. High quality and accessible palliative and end of life care can help people who are facing progressive life-threatening and life-limiting illness, and those dear to them, by focusing on their quality of life and addressing the problems associated with their situation. This paper draws attention to the scale of the challenge, some of the key areas we could address and the shifts in culture, mindset and leadership approach that are needed.

Conclusion: The Ambitions for Palliative and End of Life Care Framework explicitly recognises through its six ambitions, i.e. each person is seen as an individual, each person has fair access to care, maximising comfort and wellbeing, care is coordinated, staff are prepared to care, and each community is prepared to help. It acknowledges that achieving this whole-system approach of ‘what good looks like’ in palliative and end of life care requires every individual, organisation and society as a whole to work together, so that the goal of the best possible end of life care can be achieved.

Read the full article here. (J R Coll Physicians Edinb 2017; 47: 369–73)

The Long Goodbye: Coping With Sadness And Grief Before A Loved One Dies

By J

“…frailty and serious illness can involve significant losses over an extended period of time, giving rise to sadness and grief for years. Looming over everything is the loss of the future that an older adult and his or her family imagined they might have, often accompanied by anxiety and dread.

This pileup of complex emotions is known as “anticipatory loss.” “The deterioration of function, disability and suffering have their own grieving processes, but helping families deal with that isn’t built into the health care system,” said Dr. John Rolland, professor of psychiatry at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine…”

Rolland and several other experts offered advice on how to deal with difficult emotions that can arise with frailty or serious illness, such as acknowledging your feelings, talking openly, communicating sensitively, leaning in, seeking support.

Read the full article at https://khn.org/news/the-long-goodbye-coping-with-sadness-and-grief-before-a-loved-one-dies/view/republish/

Travel Grants to 23rd Congress of the Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine

Dear friends

The 23rd Congress of the Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine (JSPM) is open for registration. We are pleased to announce that the JSPM 2018 organizing committee will offer travel grants to overseas participants who would like to submit abstracts as International members, traveling from all parts of the world(country,25 or below at this site) to present high quality papers at the meeting. Only one person per abstract (the presenting author) will be considered for the Travel Grant. Funding for travel will not exceed JPY50,000 per grant, and will be limited to 20 members.

For more information on the congress and travel grant, please visit the website http://jspm2018.umin.jp/english/

I will be going and I look forward to seeing you there!

Joyce Chee, APHN Executive

On behalf of Prof Yoshiyuki Kizawa, APHN Council Member and President of the 23rd JSPM

 

 

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop: Nursing Care

We would like to invite participants to our 2-day palliative care workshop on Nursing Care on 27 and 28 January 2018 which kick starts our series of workshops for 2018.

Palliative Care provides patients with life-limiting illness and their families a new opportunity for choice when many curative options are lost.  The objective of this workshop is to equip healthcare professionals with necessary skill and knowledge towards provision of a holistic patient-centered care.

This workshop is conducted in English and facilitated by experienced Palliative Care Nurses from Sydney, Australia, Mr. Joshua Cohen and Ms. Caroline Belfanti. This workshop will address important aspects of care and topics include patient assessment, communication issues, wound management and the entire spectrum of patient care which is vital towards ensuring patients receive the due care they need in their preferred familiar surroundings.

Workshop registration can be made either online at our website: www.hospismalaysia.org or, completed registration form emailed to: education@hospismalaysia.org or faxed to: 603 9133 3941. For further enquiries, please contact Ira/carol at telephone: 03 9133 3936 ext. 207/204.

Thank you.

Yours sincerely,

Dr Ednin Hamzah
Chief Executive Officer, Hospis Malaysia

 

3rd Conference of the International Children’s Palliative Care Network

The 3rd Conference of the International Children’s Palliative Care Network will be held from 30 May to 2 June 2018 in Durban, South Africa.

Quoting conference chair Prof Julia Downing “There have been many developments in children’s palliative care over the past few years, some of us have been working in the field for many years, others are just starting out and we hope that this conference will be for all of you. It will be a great opportunity to learn from each other and to meet old friends and make new friends. Durban has never before been host to these many ‘greats’ in the world of children’s palliative care and it is hoped that many of you will take the opportunity to attend the conference.”

More details on the conference and registration can be found at http://www.icpcnconference.org/en/home/

 

FREE TIPS-ECHO Virtual Training on Foundation Course in Palliative Care

Recognising the huge need for palliative care education of medical and allied professionals in India, Pallium India’s Trivandrum Institute of Palliative Sciences (WHO Collaborating Centre for Training and Policy on Access to Pain Relief) announces an online educational programme to introduce pain and palliative care concepts to doctors (MBBS /BDS). This enhances skills for better pain and symptom management through patient and family oriented comprehensive approach.

Eligibility: MBBS /BDS (registered).

Laptop/tablet/smart phone with internet connectivity. If using a desktop, it needs to be connected to webcam and microphone-speaker.

Learning Mode:

All lessons will be imparted on the ECHO platform using Zoom, which is free to download

  • Case presentations
  • Didactics
  • Video demonstrations of procedures
  • Quizzes
  • Reading materials

Evaluation Criteria:

  • Completed Assignments
  • Scores in final exam

Certification:

Upon completion of the course, e-certificates will be provided to doctors who have attended all the session and fulfilled the evaluation criteria.

Course Fees: FREE

How to apply:

Download this application form, fill it up and send it to: tipsecho@palliumindia.org

Course starts on: 20th December 2017

Last date to apply: 12th December 2017

For more information, please contacttipsecho@palliumindia.org

25th Annual Conference of Indian Association of Palliative Care

25th Silver Jubilee Conference of the Indian Association for Palliative Care will be held in Delhi, India on 23rd – 25th February 2018.

They have lined up a list of expert speakers from the world and the region, including Robert Twycross, Eduardo Bruera, Julia Downing, Ilora Baroness Finlay, Cynthia Goh, Eric L. Krakauer, Fiona Rawlinson and many more!

More details on the conference and their programme can be found at http://www.iapcon2018.com/index.html

 

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop: Grief & Bereavement Care

This 2-day intense workshop on Grief & Bereavement Care concludes our final series of palliative care workshops for the year.

Associate Professor Amy Chow from the University of Hong Kong together with Dr Gilbert Fan from Singapore, will be facilitating the 2-day course which is designed towards a very interactive and engaging experience. This workshop will be immensely valuable to clinicians, psychologists, social workers  and counselors managing palliative care and care of the dying.

Registration submission can be made online at www.hospismalaysia.org/griefandbereavement/ and emailed to education@hospismalaysia.org.

APHN Mini Interview Series – Dr Masanori Mori, Japan

This interview is the second of the mini-interview series featuring members of the 17th Council of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

This month, we interviewed Dr Masanori Mori, one of the Co-opted members[i] of the Council. Dr Mori is a palliative care physician at Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, located in Hamamatsu city, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan.

Challenges in clinical practice and unique approaches

I was trained and practice palliative care in oncology for 10 years, during which, I had faced many challenging problems, but there are two distinct situations I encountered which I will like to share.

The first was providing palliative care for adolescent and young adult patients (aged 18 – 39) when I was a fellow, partly because we were in the same generation. We could provide symptom management, but many of them had severe psychosocial & spiritual pain, especially regarding them having to face early, premature death. I remember clearly a patient asking me in front of his family, “What would you do in my shoes?” It got me thinking. What would I do being in my 30s and facing death? I thought there was no right answer to that, so I had some difficulty when faced with such questions.  We had a good patient-physician relationship. I felt like I was asked the question not only as a physician, but as a person. So I shared a part of my life with the patient, and we had some good conversations. I was sharing what my hobby was, which was “Haiku”, a very short form of Japanese poetry. After he passed away, the patient’s family engraved the haiku poetry I wrote for him on his tomb.

I feel that when we are facing such situations where a patient has significant psychosocial distress, what we could do is to sit down near the patient, try to understand where his or her suffering comes from, and adopt a multidisciplinary approach to discuss how best to support the patient.

The second challenge I have faced was, no matter the improvements in palliative medicine, occasionally we still have difficulty in relieving severe symptoms at the end of life. For example, shortness of breath just before death can be quite difficult to manage even with the use of parenteral opioids. We sometimes do palliative sedation to relieve intractable symptoms like refractory shortness of breath. But before its initiation, it can be difficult to say how much palliative treatment is sufficient enough to say “this symptom is indeed refractory”, even with the best evidence and discussions among palliative care experts. Going forward, we need to improve strategies of symptom management at end of life

One unique approach I can share is that recently, there have been some trends to the early integration of oncology and palliative care in Japan. One of such activities is a “two-physician system” for advanced cancer patients; while a patient is receiving anticancer treatment by an oncologist, a palliative care physician within or outside the institution sees the patient as the other main physician, not as a consultant, alongside the oncologist. I feel that this new, collaborative approach allows for a smooth transition to palliative care, lessening the sense of abandonment felt by patients. However, this practice is still in the pilot stage in Japan.

One thing I hope to do during my term on the APHN Council is to contribute in the area of research. For example, I am interested in cross-cultural studies in Asian and Pacific countries to understand similarities and differences in palliative care practices. Such data could help us appreciate the situations of each country, and lay the foundation for future collaboration.

Life and inspiration

My friends and colleagues are usually surprised to know that I am interested in Haiku poetry because it is not very popular among people of my age. (Haiku poetry is usually popular among older people in Japan.) I have 4 kids, so I also enjoy playing with them.

There were many people who inspired me in my life; my dad and mum, my previous and current mentors in US and Japan, and Dr Shigeaki Hinohara who was one of the founders of the APHN. Many of them share similar characteristics in terms of how to view the world, manage challenges, take collaborative actions, and enjoy life. They all have certain aspects which became my inspiration in one way or another.

For example, Dr. Hinohara’s writings and works are very inspirational. I was so inspired by his altruism, perspectives, and medical and social activities that I visited him at St. Luke’s International Hospital 10 years ago when I was a palliative care fellow in Houston. Dr. Hinohara was 95 years old then. It was about 10-15 minutes when we talked; Dr. Hinohara listened to me, and shared his vision of not only launching a graduate medical school but also ceasing wars worldwide. He left the world at the age of 105 but he pioneered in numerous fields in medicine ranging from preventive medicine to end of life care , as well as medical and nursing education. Moreover, Dr. Hinohara contributed to the entire society by publishing a number of million-seller books such as “Living long, living good”, and initiating something very new such as so-called “Smart Senior Association”.

As a new member, I very much look forward to working with you all at APHN!

By: Joyce Chee, APHN Executive
The article first appeared in the APHN newsletter Issue 34.
All information is correct at time of publishing.
__________________________________________________________
[i] The APHN Council consists of 7 members to be appointed by sectors on a rotation to be determined alphabetically according to the name of the sectors (Constitution 12.2a), 7 elected members, and 6 Co-opted members.

SHC-LCPC Multidisciplinary Forum – Supporting Children Whose Parents are Dying from Cancer

Register online at https://www.duke-nus.edu.sg/lcpc/shc-lcpc-multidisciplinary-forum or email lcpc@duke-nus.edu.sg for more information and enquiries.

BNI Palliative Care Scholarships 2018

Hospice NZ is committed to growing leaders in hospice palliative care. Thanks to the ongoing support and generosity of our national partner, BNI New Zealand, we are delighted to offer study scholarships for 2018.

Scholarship applicants must show the relevance of their chosen study to their particular role and ongoing professional development needs within hospice palliative care. They must be either employed by a member hospice or hold current individual membership of Hospice NZ.

The scholarships will cover tuition/ course fees up to $1,000 for postgraduate study provided by an accredited institution. Applications meeting the criteria will be considered by the Hospice NZ education committee. Applications for larger course fee costs will be judged on a case by case basis.

Applications will close at 5pm on Wednesday 29 November 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by Wednesday 13 December 2017. We will then require written confirmation and formal acceptance by Friday 12 January 2018.

Please click here for an application form and further information.