‘Happy Death Day’ – palliative care and death awareness exhibition held in Thailand

This article was originally from eHospice.

Some 3,300 participants, with another 30,000 people watching the exhibition online, attended the ‘Happy Death Day’ palliative care and death awareness exhibition. The exhibition consisted of various zones, consisted of a talk on how to prepare for death and a ‘Last Talk’ session where people diagnosed with terminal illnesses share their experiences, feelings, hopes and dreams. The second day saw participants reflecting on their lives while lying in a coffin at the exhibition and interacting with speakers, patients, carers and the healthcare team at the ‘Death Cafe’, a casual setting to promote conversations on palliative care or death-related issues.

Read the full article here.

 

An exhibition is an interactive way to promote awareness of hospice and palliative care during World Hospice and Palliative Care Day 2017Email us at aphn@aphn.org to let us know what activities you will be having to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care.

We all grieve for lost loved ones. Here’s how one photographer dealt with it in his own way.

This article was originally from PCAeNews.

Erik Simander pursued the photo project to cope with the sudden loss of his grandmother. Through it, he managed to spend time with his grandfather, helping him cope with the sudden death of his wife, before his eventual passing. “The death of one partner before the other—is inevitable, and the subject is maybe a bit taboo. No one likes to talk about it, but it happens.” -Erik Simander

Read the full article here.

 

A picture is worth a thousand words. Hold a photo exhibition to celebrate World Hospice and Palliative Care Day 2017: Universal Health Coverage and Palliative Care – Don’t leave those suffering behind. Email us at aphn@aphn.org to let us know what activities will you be having to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care.

Living with dementia: carers’ experiences in their own words

This article was originally on Palliative Matters.

This is the second time palliative care nurse consultant James Daley has used hired actors and verbatim storytelling to bring stories to the stage. The script, which features first-hand accounts by carers of people with dementia whom Mr Daley interviewed, was jointly written by Dr Jane Tolman and Dr Elspeth Correy and Mr James Daley himself. To improve understanding of dementia, facilities managers of residential aged care facilities in Bathurst were keen on supporting the project. They feel that families “don’t understand that it is a terminal illness” when they bring people with dementia to nursing homes, which makes it more difficult for them to instigate the palliative approach.

Read the full article here.

 

Drama is a fun-filled way of presenting heartfelt stories of our patients’ daily interactions. Will your organisation be putting up a drama production for the World Hospice and Palliative Care Day? The theme for World Hospice and Palliative Care Day 2017 is: Universal Health Coverage and Palliative Care – Don’t leave those suffering behind, and will be held on 14 October. Email us at aphn@aphn.org to let us know what activities will you be having to celebrate and support hospice and palliative care.

APHN Dialog Session #6: Management of Total Pain

Welcome to the 6th Session of the APHN Dialogue!

In this session, Dr Raymond Woo from Hong Kong will be speaking on the topic of “Management of Total Pain”.

This webinar is FREE for all palliative care colleagues! Sign up NOW!

Please email aphn@aphn.org for enquiries.

SHC-LCPC August 2017 – Journeying with Persons with Dementia in a Hospice

For further information or enquiries, please email lcpc@duke-nus.edu.sg.

APHN statement on our stand against the deliberate ending of life

The Asia Pacific Hospice and Palliative Care Network promotes access to good-quality hospice and palliative care for all in the Asia Pacific region. We value every moment of life and do not support any action that has the intention of shortening a person’s life. Restoring dignity and enhancing quality of life is the basis of palliative care.

We do not support the deliberate ending of life and we view with concern moves in certain jurisdictions in the region to legalise physician-administered euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.  Licensing doctors to administer or supply lethal drugs to seriously-ill patients has no place in the practice of health care.  Such moves devalue the dying and undermine society’s responsibility to protect its most vulnerable members.

Australia and New Zealand are acknowledged leaders in fostering palliative care development in the Asia Pacific region. In much of this region, pioneers are struggling to establish good end-of-life services in the face of little political and financial support. Eighty percent of the world’s dying has little or no access to morphine for pain relief.

The United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand have been ranked as the top three countries worldwide in the 2015 Economist Quality of Death Index. The eyes of the world are on these nations and on how they discharge their responsibilities to dying people.

For those of us trying to improve end-of-life care, licensing doctors to provide or administer lethal drugs to patients poses serious risks of sabotaging efforts around the globe to convince governments that pain relief and good end-of-life care are basic human rights.

The Asia Pacific Hospice and Palliative Care Network appeals to you therefore to recognise your responsibilities on the world stage when considering any proposed legislation before you.

 

Yours faithfully

 

Associate Professor Cynthia Goh
Chair, Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Thank you everyone for your support. The comments section is closed. You may read the archived comments below.

Comments from the community:

“Thank you for highlighting the risk that legalising assisted dying risks sabotaging efforts to improve pain management, palliative care and end of life care in countries where there is a poor commitment to human rights.”

“The vast majority of patients can die comfortably with good palliative care. Resources are better utilised enhancing good palliative care, rather than developing morally and ethically grey services (Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide) that may only benefit a very small minority. Society should evolve to compassionately care for dying patients, and not evolve towards using euthanasia as a convenient but cold alternative.”

“It is a matter of urgency to stop this move to legalize Euthanasia, whatever else it may be called, PAS or MAID etc.”

“As a specialist physician in Palliative Care for 34 years I have assisted more than 30,000 people at the end of their lives. I have never killed anyone and find the idea abhorrent.”

“Human rights is the right to live till the end”

“We need palliative care not euthanasia”

“I support the APHN statement against Physician assisted suicide and Euthanasia”

“Respecting life is to allow the person to live to the end with holistic support”

“They say assisted dying doesn’t hurt palliative care. Sign up to show you disagree.”

“I fully support the APHN stance on resisting any law change on assisted dying”

“No to Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide! We are committed to the defense of human life from womb to tomb. There is a time to live and a time to die. Let us not artificially prolong nor shorten life or the dying process. It’s all about respect, stewardship, and accountability.”

“To take care of Elders and Sick people is Asian tradition. We should generate multidimensional & creative ways to reduce the sufferings at the end-of-life, not PAS/Euthanasia.”

“End of life care/ care of terminally ill is NOT physician assisted suicide.”

“There can be no guaranteed legal protection for those that are vulnerable against coercion if euthanasia is legalised. The focus needs to be on equitable and good palliative care for all.”

“I wholeheartedly support the invaluable skill and support that is given to patients from our own Palliative Care team. I would also welcome more frontline education given to medical staff to enable more “to get on board with timely and compassionate” patient referrals to the Palliative team. I would also support more funding to enable more frontline staff to be trained and encouraged to “grow” Palliative services in our mainstream hospitals. Thank you”

“Better understanding of palliative care by both health professionals and the community is needed to overcome the myths of euthanasia and the slippery slope of legal quagmire if euthanasia was to be legalised in Victoria.”

“The Chinese word for euthanasia is 安乐死, which literally means “happy death”. However, “happy death” is not the same as “Happy. Death”

“Doctors never kill. Even at the last moment of life has its own values.”

“Palliative care provides comfort for patient till the end of their life, it does not provide comfort to end their life.”

“We need to find better ways to care for human beings that are suffering instead of silencing the sufferer through actions of euthanasia or to provide the means for assisted dying to occur. Fund better care options for the chronically ill and dying – not legislate against the living that are already vulnerable and need care”

Palliative Care Workshop on Suffering and Hope

Workshop On Suffering & Hope: 4 – 6 August 2017

This three (3) day workshop, in collaboration with the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network, addresses how to deal with issues of suffering as many may not know how to give hope when all curative treatment becomes futile. It is most suitable for doctors, senior clinicians, nurses, psychologists, counsellors and especially those involved in making crucial decisions when the transitions from cure, to prolonging survival and palliation becomes the aim of holistic patient-centred care.

Please find here, the workshop program and registration form for those who are interested to attend. Registration submission can be made either online at our website: www.hospismalaysia.org or, emailed to: education@hospismalaysia.org or faxed to: 603 9133 3941. For further enquiries, please contact Wai Mun or Ira at telephone: 03 9133 3936 extension 267.

Deadline extended for bidding of Asia Pacific Hospice Conference 2021!

The APHN Council is pleased to invite member organisations wishing to host the 14th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference 2021 to send in their application to the APHN Secretariat.

Click here to download the bid form and the bidding documents.

Please email the bid documents to aphn@aphn.org.

Please note to send your file as “Bid for 14th APHC_<your organisation name>”

All organisations submitting a bid must fulfill the following requirements for their application to be considered.

  • Have been a member of APHN for AT LEAST 3 years
  • All bids must be complete in writing

Please note the deadline for submission of bids has been extended till 21 July 2017.

Standards & Quality of Care Indicators in Palliative Care Symposium

“In 2014, the World Health Assembly passed a resolution to strengthen palliative care as a component of a country’s health care system. The Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA) / WHO Atlas in Palliative Care 2014, maps out national development in palliative care. In each country, patients, healthcare workers, governments, donors and other stakeholders are starting to enquire about standards of care and what indicators could be used to compare palliative care services.”

This meeting organised by Hospis Malaysia and in collaboration with the WHPCA, brings representatives from several regional and national palliative care organisations to discuss the various approaches taken to address the above topic.

Find out more on https://www.hospismalaysia.org/symposiumpc/.

For further information, please contact Wai Mun at +61-03-9133 3936 (ext: 267) or email education@hospismalaysia.org

LCPC Palliative Care Course for Social Workers

SHC-LCPC Forum June 2017 – Managing Challenging Patient Behaviours in End-of-Life Care

Bid for 14th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference 2021 Opens!

The APHN Council is pleased to invite member organisations wishing to host the 14th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference 2021 to send in their application to the APHN Secretariat.

Click here to download the bid form and the bidding documents.

Please email the bid documents to aphn@aphn.org.

Please note to send your file as “Bid for 14th APHC_<your organisation name>”

All organisations submitting a bid must fulfill the following requirements for their application to be considered.

  • Have been a member of APHN for AT LEAST 3 years
  • All bids must be complete in writing

Please note the deadline for submission of bids has been extended till 21 July 2017.