Hong Kong 2nd Community End-of-Life Care International Conference

The Community End-of-Life Care International Conference will be held on June 20-21, 2018. Sponsored by the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, registration is FREE.

Some of the keynote speakers for this conference are Dr. Stephen Connor – Executive Director, Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance (WHPCA), Prof. Irene Higginson – Professor of Palliative Care and Policy King’s College London; King’s Health Partners, Director, Cicely Saunders Institute, Prof. David Currow – Professor of Palliative Medicine, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Prof. Wang Ying Wei –Director General, Health Promotion Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan

Find out more at the conference website here.

Travel Grants to 23rd Congress of the Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine

Dear friends

The 23rd Congress of the Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine (JSPM) is open for registration. We are pleased to announce that the JSPM 2018 organizing committee will offer travel grants to overseas participants who would like to submit abstracts as International members, traveling from all parts of the world(country,25 or below at this site) to present high quality papers at the meeting. Only one person per abstract (the presenting author) will be considered for the Travel Grant. Funding for travel will not exceed JPY50,000 per grant, and will be limited to 20 members.

For more information on the congress and travel grant, please visit the website http://jspm2018.umin.jp/english/

I will be going and I look forward to seeing you there!

Joyce Chee, APHN Executive

On behalf of Prof Yoshiyuki Kizawa, APHN Council Member and President of the 23rd JSPM

 

 

25th Annual Conference of Indian Association of Palliative Care

25th Silver Jubilee Conference of the Indian Association for Palliative Care will be held in Delhi, India on 23rd – 25th February 2018.

They have lined up a list of expert speakers from the world and the region, including Robert Twycross, Eduardo Bruera, Julia Downing, Ilora Baroness Finlay, Cynthia Goh, Eric L. Krakauer, Fiona Rawlinson and many more!

More details on the conference and their programme can be found at http://www.iapcon2018.com/index.html

 

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop: Grief & Bereavement Care

This 2-day intense workshop on Grief & Bereavement Care concludes our final series of palliative care workshops for the year.

Associate Professor Amy Chow from the University of Hong Kong together with Dr Gilbert Fan from Singapore, will be facilitating the 2-day course which is designed towards a very interactive and engaging experience. This workshop will be immensely valuable to clinicians, psychologists, social workers  and counselors managing palliative care and care of the dying.

Registration submission can be made online at www.hospismalaysia.org/griefandbereavement/ and emailed to education@hospismalaysia.org.

APHN Mini Interview Series – Dr Masanori Mori, Japan

This interview is the second of the mini-interview series featuring members of the 17th Council of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

This month, we interviewed Dr Masanori Mori, one of the Co-opted members[i] of the Council. Dr Mori is a palliative care physician at Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, located in Hamamatsu city, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan.

Challenges in clinical practice and unique approaches

I was trained and practice palliative care in oncology for 10 years, during which, I had faced many challenging problems, but there are two distinct situations I encountered which I will like to share.

The first was providing palliative care for adolescent and young adult patients (aged 18 – 39) when I was a fellow, partly because we were in the same generation. We could provide symptom management, but many of them had severe psychosocial & spiritual pain, especially regarding them having to face early, premature death. I remember clearly a patient asking me in front of his family, “What would you do in my shoes?” It got me thinking. What would I do being in my 30s and facing death? I thought there was no right answer to that, so I had some difficulty when faced with such questions.  We had a good patient-physician relationship. I felt like I was asked the question not only as a physician, but as a person. So I shared a part of my life with the patient, and we had some good conversations. I was sharing what my hobby was, which was “Haiku”, a very short form of Japanese poetry. After he passed away, the patient’s family engraved the haiku poetry I wrote for him on his tomb.

I feel that when we are facing such situations where a patient has significant psychosocial distress, what we could do is to sit down near the patient, try to understand where his or her suffering comes from, and adopt a multidisciplinary approach to discuss how best to support the patient.

The second challenge I have faced was, no matter the improvements in palliative medicine, occasionally we still have difficulty in relieving severe symptoms at the end of life. For example, shortness of breath just before death can be quite difficult to manage even with the use of parenteral opioids. We sometimes do palliative sedation to relieve intractable symptoms like refractory shortness of breath. But before its initiation, it can be difficult to say how much palliative treatment is sufficient enough to say “this symptom is indeed refractory”, even with the best evidence and discussions among palliative care experts. Going forward, we need to improve strategies of symptom management at end of life

One unique approach I can share is that recently, there have been some trends to the early integration of oncology and palliative care in Japan. One of such activities is a “two-physician system” for advanced cancer patients; while a patient is receiving anticancer treatment by an oncologist, a palliative care physician within or outside the institution sees the patient as the other main physician, not as a consultant, alongside the oncologist. I feel that this new, collaborative approach allows for a smooth transition to palliative care, lessening the sense of abandonment felt by patients. However, this practice is still in the pilot stage in Japan.

One thing I hope to do during my term on the APHN Council is to contribute in the area of research. For example, I am interested in cross-cultural studies in Asian and Pacific countries to understand similarities and differences in palliative care practices. Such data could help us appreciate the situations of each country, and lay the foundation for future collaboration.

Life and inspiration

My friends and colleagues are usually surprised to know that I am interested in Haiku poetry because it is not very popular among people of my age. (Haiku poetry is usually popular among older people in Japan.) I have 4 kids, so I also enjoy playing with them.

There were many people who inspired me in my life; my dad and mum, my previous and current mentors in US and Japan, and Dr Shigeaki Hinohara who was one of the founders of the APHN. Many of them share similar characteristics in terms of how to view the world, manage challenges, take collaborative actions, and enjoy life. They all have certain aspects which became my inspiration in one way or another.

For example, Dr. Hinohara’s writings and works are very inspirational. I was so inspired by his altruism, perspectives, and medical and social activities that I visited him at St. Luke’s International Hospital 10 years ago when I was a palliative care fellow in Houston. Dr. Hinohara was 95 years old then. It was about 10-15 minutes when we talked; Dr. Hinohara listened to me, and shared his vision of not only launching a graduate medical school but also ceasing wars worldwide. He left the world at the age of 105 but he pioneered in numerous fields in medicine ranging from preventive medicine to end of life care , as well as medical and nursing education. Moreover, Dr. Hinohara contributed to the entire society by publishing a number of million-seller books such as “Living long, living good”, and initiating something very new such as so-called “Smart Senior Association”.

As a new member, I very much look forward to working with you all at APHN!

By: Joyce Chee, APHN Executive
The article first appeared in the APHN newsletter Issue 34.
All information is correct at time of publishing.
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[i] The APHN Council consists of 7 members to be appointed by sectors on a rotation to be determined alphabetically according to the name of the sectors (Constitution 12.2a), 7 elected members, and 6 Co-opted members.

SG Pall eBook

The Lien Centre for Palliative Care (LCPC) is pleased to launch the SG Pall eBook, a mobile- friendly online resource for palliative care tips. This product arose from a  collaboration between LCPC and a group of specialist Palliative Care practitioners from various institutions across Singapore. The  eBook aims to provide quick and  easy access to basic palliative knowledge (through their mobile phones) for  busy healthcare professionals on the go, and is suitable for all care settings.

Access the SG Pall eBook here!

APHN-Hospis Malaysia Workshop: Pain & Symptom Management

One of the objectives of palliative care for patients and their families is to improve their quality of life (QOL). Ensuring good pain and symptoms control for patients with life-limiting illness will help achieve this objective. This three-day workshop deals with aspects of both pharmacological and psychological issues on pain and symptom management so that patients with life-limiting illness are given the opportunity to live out their days with meaning and with as little distress as possible.

Thus, successful pain control requires a multidisciplinary approach to treatment that addresses all aspects of care and suffering. As usual, our workshop concentrates on small group settings and will be most beneficial to healthcare providers working in a palliative or oncology setting, and other related specialties, with a general interest in palliative care.

Registration submission can be made online at www.hospismalaysia.org/painandsymptom/ and emailed to education@hospismalaysia.org.

WHPCD 2017: Health Screening and Information Booths by Singapore Hospice Council

Join the Singapore Hospice Council and their member organisations to celebrate the World Hospice and Palliative Care Day with health screening, information booths and live performances to engage the public to learn about palliative care.

Find out more here.

 

What is your organisation doing for the World Hospice & Palliative Care Day & Voices for Hospices 2017? Let us know in the comments below or email us at aphn@aphn.org!

WHPCD 2017: Patient Get-together by Pallium India

Pallium India will be organising “Thalolam 2017” in conjunction with the World Hospice Palliative Care Day 2017. About 500 participants, including patients with life-limiting diseases and their family patients, will gather on 14 October 2017 for the get-together.

Read more here.

 

What is your organisation doing for the World Hospice & Palliative Care Day & Voices for Hospices 2017? Let us know in the comments below or email us at aphn@aphn.org!

WHPCD 2017: Hospice Film Festival/Book Fair by Hospice Foundation of Taiwan

In conjunction with the WHPCD 2017, Hospice Foundation of Taiwan will be holding a Film Festival featuring ‘Oscar et le Dame rose’, ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ and ‘In His Chart’. There will also be a feature talk by movie director Wu Nien-jen and a book fair focusing on palliative and hospice care.

 

What is your organisation doing for the World Hospice & Palliative Care Day & Voices for Hospices 2017? Let us know in the comments below or email us at aphn@aphn.org!

2017 世界慈怀暨缓和医疗日 – 关键信息

2017 世界慈怀暨缓和医疗日

主题:全民健康覆盖与安宁缓和医疗别遗落了在苦海中的人群

COUNT 数据)

世界42% 的国家没有缓和医疗服务

  • 衡量重点:是否所有卫生服务的质量合格而有效,并是大家可支付的范围?
  • 数据测量后才会有行动!缓和医疗的相关数据应含在全民健康覆盖的数据里
  • 领导者与医疗体系应携手同行,照顾那些罹患威胁生命疾病的人
  • 别再等政策制定!应当机立断,呼吁领导者行动,罹患威胁生命疾病的人不应该被大家遗忘!
  • 现今只有20 个国家将缓和医疗列入国家医疗体系
  • 每年有4千万人需要缓和医疗服务;包括2 千万需要临终关怀的人
  • 可是,只有14% 的临终需求被服务到,完整的缓和医疗供应更少于10%
  • 78% 的需求存在于发展中国家

CARE 护理)

没有缓和医疗服务不算全民健康覆盖

  • 全民健康覆盖的定义是,确保所有人都能获得所需的健康促进、预防、治疗、康复和缓和医疗卫生服务
  • 缓和医疗是全民健康覆盖里不可或缺的项目
  • 全民健康覆盖,包括缓和医疗,是确保持续性的关键
  • 全民健康覆盖是确保所有人都能获得所需的卫生服务,包括缓和医疗,保障人们不会因使用这些服务而陷入经济困难
  • 凡是需要卫生服务、缓和医疗的人,都应获得有质量并且负担得起的服务
  • 全民健康覆盖的目标就是让所有人能够公平地获得卫生服务,尤其是针对亟需要缓和医疗的人群
  • 需要缓和医疗服务的人往往是最为需要卫生服务的人群,他们应被列入全民健康覆盖里

COST 资金)

缓和医疗可以为患有严重或威脅生命疾病之病人家庭减轻经济负担

  • 没有人应该因病致贫
  • 昂贵的治疗费因没有列入国家医疗保健系统导致病人承担财务风险
  • 罹患威胁生命的疾病之病人家庭会因支付无效昂贵的治疗陷入经济困难
  • 如果家中经济支柱病倒或照顾者需要辞职照顾病患,少了经济来源,会造成财务风险
  • 昂贵的就医交通费用会增加重病的病人跟家属其经济风险
  • 世界的大部分地区,慈怀及缓和医疗机构提供的服务是免费的
  • 所有人,不论其收入、疾病种类或年龄,都应获得国家基本卫生服务,包括缓和医疗

Resources

Imagine: UHC and palliative care video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0xy1jMwDBg

APHN Mini Interview Series – Dr Ong Wah Ying, Singapore

Dr Ong Wah Ying

Dr Ong Wah Ying

This interview is the first of the mini interview series featuring members of the 17th Council of the Asia Pacific Hospice Palliative Care Network (APHN).

In this issue, we are interviewing Dr Ong Wah Ying, the appointed council member[1] from Singapore.  Dr Ong is also the Medical Director of Dover Park Hospice (DPH) and a council member of the Singapore Hospice Council (SHC), the national umbrella body.

What is something about you that will surprise people?

I used to be the squash captain back in high school! People find it surprising because I hardly exercise nowadays. But I still have a lot of hidden energy in me!

You learnt how to cook when spending 6 months (under the Ministry of Health’s Health Manpower Development Plan) with Southern Adelaide Palliative Care services. What was the experience like?

There was a smoke detector in the apartment and the fire engine will arrive if I do any heavy cooking. So I learned how to cook rice using the microwave oven and that is an achievement! I will mix it with my canned tuna and sometimes hard boiled eggs too!

If you were to choose an object to represent the journey in palliative care, what will it be and why?

I would think it will be a rubber band! Sometimes we need to stretch like a rubber band in order to tie things together. But at the same time, we need to be careful not to overstretch till we snap.

In order to do our line of work, we must try. We must go all the way. We are passionate people. Especially during the training years, most of the time we feel like we can do everything. But we really have to learn to find our own limits along the way and find out when to ask for help from team members. Sometimes we do not even recognise that we are fatigued. Many of us, including me, learned this the hard way.

A rubber band will return to its original shape after stretching. So my experience is to do more when it is time to do more and come back to the original shape. Look for more rubber bands if you need strength and learn to shoot if your target is far away!

Do you see any synergies in the roles you play at DPH, SHC and APHN? What are some areas you think Singapore can be more involved on a regional level?

Yes, definitely. I think APHN needs a greater presence in Singapore. It is important for us to be part of the collective voice for important issues, like stating our stand against euthanasia. The local community needs to know that we cannot be isolated. A lot more can be done in terms of bringing information and ideas across and back. We can collaborate to further extend our local education arms.

Having more involvement from medical students, trainees and various levels of staff will give them greater exposure and broaden their horizon. By being part of a common interest group, we can learn from each other, and be more aware of the updates of developments in services, education and research around the region. We can also leverage on existing knowledge and research to share with other countries, such as by hosting people for attachments and visitors from the region.

I believe that Singapore can contribute by sharing our experiences in non cancers like dementia, how we start-up services as well as new discoveries in the field through the APHN dialog platform. In addition to coordinating sharing by experts in our country, we can learn from experts in the region too. This is something I hope to build across the three organisations.

___________________________________________________________________

[1] The APHN Council consists of 7 members to be appointed by sectors on a rotation to be determined alphabetically according to the name of the sectors (Constitution 12.2a), 7 elected members, and 6 Co-opted member.

The article first appeared in the APHN newsletter Issue 33. Read here.
All information is correct at time of publishing.

By: Joyce Chee, APHN Executive